Be a Good Interviewer by Showing Some Respect

I have heard thousands of stories about good and bad job interviewers for almost 20 years. Why is it that, when someone becomes a hiring manager, they suddenly forget what it was like to actually be interviewed? Why is there a disconnect? 

EXAMPLE OF DISRESPECT

One of my clients who wanted to move from Tampa to Atlanta landed the perfect job interview. She thought it went well, but never heard back. Did the interviewer know that she was trying to relocate? Yes. 

How far was her drive from Tampa to Atlanta? 500 miles!

I’m still frustrated that she was shown such lack of respect. Even when the interviewer decided not to hire her, he should have at least called to let her know. 

Here are some guidelines for interviewers. They seem obvious, but I guess not! 

SHOW RESPECT. MAKE PEOPLE COMFORTABLE. EVERYONE IS NERVOUS. 

  • Don’t keep people waiting in the lobby for a long time. You would be surprised how often this happens without apology. 
  • Come prepared. Read the resumes before the interview! At the very least, be engaged and ready to talk. 
  • Think about what questions you can ask to determine if a person might be a good fit for the job. Don’t just wing it. 
  • Be friendly, professional, and easy to talk with. 

BE CLEAR ABOUT THE NEXT STEPS AND TIMELINE 

The most stressful part of interviewing is waiting to hear back from a company, particularly if an interview seemed promising. Not contacting the applicants shows lack of proper business etiquette. Yes, you might be under strict corporate policies about what you can tell people after an interview, but that is not an excuse to not contact them. 

Just tell people what to expect. It is that basic. How hard can that be? 

  • What is the next step? 
  • What is the timeline? 
  • What do you need to move this process forward?
  • What is the best way to follow-up? How frequently? 

PLEASE, DON’T LEAVE PEOPLE DANGLING. EITHER HIRE THEM OR THANK THEM FOR THEIR TIME. 

SHOW THE SAME RESPECT YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE SHOWN IN AN INTERVIEW.